Category archive

After the battle

Longread: The incredible patrol of six soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division

in After the battle/Longread
Soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division keep an eye on the other side of the river from the Rijkdijk near Heteren.

ARNHEM – It is a bizarre story, but it is true. A month after the end of Market Garden, six American soldiers were ordered to take two German prisoners of war north of the Rhine. The patrol returned a day later with 32 German prisoners of war. (By: Patrick Arink) The bizarre exploration took place…

Keep Reading

One British soldier remains behind in Arnhem for months!

in After the battle
The police station in Bovenbeekstraat. Robert Pealing was here until October 31st.

While the British airborne division had long since been defeated and Arnhem had been evacuated by order of the Germans, there was still one British soldier in the city center of Arnhem. He managed to stay out of the hands of the Germans until the liberation in April 1945. This is the remarkable story of…

Keep Reading

The escape of Brigadier General Shan Hackett

in After the battle
Brigadier Shan Hackett (center) with Field Marshal Montgomery and General Roy Urquhart prior to Operation Market Garden.

The story of General Hackett’s escape is exemplary of the courage of the Dutch resistance to help English soldiers stranded during the Battle of Arnhem. Brigadier General John ‘Shan’ Hackett was wounded in Oosterbeek on September 24, 1944. Hackett ended up in the Elisabeth Gasthuis. With the help of the resistance, he was able to…

Keep Reading

Escaped after the Battle of Arnhem, with the help of a teacher from Utrecht

in After the battle
British wounded are taken away during the Battle of Arnhem along the Utrechtseweg, near the Oranjestraat.

At the end of 1944, 26-year-old teacher Nel Stuij was closely involved in the escape of a number of wounded British soldiers who remained in occupied territory after the Battle of Arnhem. Just before her death in 2012, she wrote down her war memories.“We just did what had to be done.” “When we heard that…

Keep Reading

German divers attack the bridges in Nijmegen

in After the battle
The railway bridge (left) and the Waal bridge (right) at Nijmegen.

Operation Market Garden officially lasted until September 25, 1944. The battle ended with the withdrawal of the remnants of the British airborne division in Oosterbeek. But a few days later the final agreement of Market Garden was for the Germans. On the night of September 28 to 29, 1944, German divers managed to blow up…

Keep Reading

Operation Pegasus: the successful escape of 130 stranded British soldiers

in After the battle

After the British withdrew across the Rhine during the night of September 25 to 26, many paratroopers and air crews were still left behind on the north side of the river. Through a daring escape, 130 soldiers managed to return to the Allied lines a month later. The escape, called Operation Pegasus, is considered one…

Keep Reading

October 7, 1944: the bombing of the city center of Arnhem

in After the battle
Aerial photo of the city center of Arnhem by an RAF reconnaissance aircraft on November 4, 1944. (Photo: Gelders Archive.)

After operation Market Garden had ended, the fighting in Arnhem was still not completely over. On October 7, 1944, the Rhine Bridge in Arnhem, which had been fought over so hard, was destroyed by bombing. After the Battle of Arnhem was lost by the Allies at the end of September 1944, the British and American…

Keep Reading

6 months after Market Garden there was another Battle of Arnhem

in After the battle
Allied tanks on the Hommelseweg. The photo was probably taken on April 16 or 17, after the liberation of Arnhem.

The ground for the second Battle of Arnhem was laid while the Battle of Arnhem was still raging in full force in September 1944. On September 23, 1944, the German occupiers decided to evacuate the entire population of Arnhem. With the exception of some firefighters, police officers and Burgers’ zookeepers, all residents of Arnhem had…

Keep Reading

PHOTOS: A photo shoot of some British POW

in After the battle/Arnhem/Photos

The photo above this article is world famous. The photo can be found in many books about the Battle of Arnhem and has, for example, been used as a cover photo of the Dutch book “Another view on the Battle of Arnhem” by Peter Berends. At the corner of Steenstraat near Musis Sacrum, the German…

Keep Reading

PHOTOS: This is what the Rhine Bridge area looked like after the fighting

in After the battle/Arnhem

For more than 80 hours, approximately 750 British paratroopers, led by Colonel John Frost, had defended their positions on the north side of the Rhine Bridge. Forced by a shortage of ammunition, but mainly because all the buildings that were occupied by the British had been set on fire, they had to surrender in the…

Keep Reading

Go to Top